LEAP YEAR February 29th,  LEAP DAY,  Leap Year Baby,  Leap Year Babies,  Born on Februray 29th, Born on Leap Day.  @ February 29th Leap Day Leap Year a quadrennial celebration

Available for newspaper (High Res) / web use please contact us.
 @ February 29 LEAP Year - LEAP Day © 1995-2008 Leap Day (February 29th)
@ February 29 LEAP Year - LEAP Day
(an extra day / 24 hours / 1440 minutes / 86,400 seconds) Why???

the Original Leap Day Site
Welcome Home LEAPERS! page down for more info!







Ty Lillypad - Frog14k Yellow Gold Diamond Frog Prince Pendant (.04 ct)Russ Berrie Shining Stars Frog
LeapFrog LeapFrog
leap frog

Join our Flickr Group to share photos and discussion on LEAP Day.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/february29th/

Click on the cards below to see other cards I have designed.

http://www.mystro.com/

John Strohsacker (10 leap years) -Feb 29, 2008  ENJOY

Some great fun facts for those of us lucky enough to be born on a day that comes around every four years. 
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You have a 1 in 1506 or 1 in 1,461 chance of being born on February 29th 
Depends how you calculate it and what day it falls on.
Want To Know Why? Click Here
 
About 200,000 people in the US & 4.1 million people in the World are Leap Day Babies
based on the US Census Population Clocks
"Growing up when there wasn't a 29th, my parents gave me a "birthday weekend" so we usually celebrated the closest weekend, the 28th and the 1st! I didn't get presents every day, but  they did something special for me each day!"   Melissa W.
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Sunday on Feb. 29 has occurred only three  times from 1900 to 2000: in 1920, 1948 and 1976. 
After 2004, the next year it will happen is 2032.  Happens every 28 years.

Here's where we start:

Why do we have Leap Day?
(and why do I only get a REAL birthday once every four years?)

w/information provided by Royal Greenwich Observatory:

Our solar year (the time required for Earth to travel once around the Sun) is 365.24219 days.

Our calendar year is either 365 days in non leap years or 366 days in leap years (Feb 29th inserted). 

A leap year every 4 years gives us 365.25 days, sending our seasons off course and eventually in the wrong months.

To change .25 days to .24219, we need to skip a few leap days (Feb 29ths) .... century marks not divisible by 400.  So with a few calculations tweek the calendar by skipping 3 of 4 century leap years to average out our calendar year to 365.2425, which is pretty darn close to the solar year 365.24219.

Here’s the history:
The Romans originally had a 355-day calendar.  To keep up with the seasons, an extra 22 or 23-day month was inserted every second year.  For reasons unknown, this extra month was only observed now and then.  By Julius Caesar’s time, the seasons no longer occurred at the same calendar periods as history had shown.  To correct this, Caesar eliminated the extra month and added one or two extra days to the end of various months (his month included, which was Quintilis, later renamed Julius we know it as July).  This extended the calendar to 365 days.  Also intended was an extra calendar day every fourth year (following the 28th day of Februarius).  However, after Caesar’s death in 44 B.C., the calendars were written with an extra day every 3 years instead of every 4 until corrected in 8 A.D.  So again, the calendar drifted away from the seasons.  By 1582, Pope Gregory XIII recognized that Easter would eventually become closer and closer to Christmas.  The calendar was reformed so that a leap day would occur in any year that is divisible by 4 but not divisible by 100 except when the year is divisible by 400.  Thus 1600 and 2000, although century marks, have a Leap Day. 

The calendar we use today, known as the Gregorian calendar, makes our year 365.2425 days only off from our solar year by .00031, which amounts to only one day’s error after 4,000 years.
------------------------------------------
Here is a great starting place to learn more about the calendar and leap day
Royal Greenwich Observatory.
Leaflet No. 52:`The Year AD 2000'   |   Leaflet No. 50: `Calendar' |  Leaflet No. 48: `LeapYear'
These were replaced and here is an updated Leap Year explaination

Calendars from around the world (e-book)




The question you will be asked all day is ....
Q: When does a person born on Feb 29 celebrate his birthday? 
A: Answer is Here  by Mensanator
Send me some creative responses
http://www.flickr.com/groups/february29th/
"I was born on Feb 29th 1980 and usually celebrate on the 28th.
This year I turn 21,  I have to celebrate on March 1st so I can legally buy a drink" In2trouble

Order the LEAP YEAR Cocktail
http://www.mystro.com/leap.htm
Featured in the New York Times | also in USA Today 2/29/2000


>INDEX
>Fun leap stories! >What Happened 2/29?
>Festival
>Leap Day Photo
>Sadie Hawkins Day February 29th too?

"Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November;
All the rest have thirty-one
Excepting February alone:
Which hath but twenty-eight, in fine,
Till leap year gives it twenty-nine." :-)
"Thirty Days Hath September" rhyme


"Was XXXX year a Leap Year?" 
JavaScript Leap Year Calculator by dataIP
to the rescue... click here

Bill Hollon<<><>>calendarman
All you ever wanted to know about calendars 




Cake Design by  Santoni's Market  Copyrighted 2000-2004
Quadrennial LeapDayPotpourri(fun leap stories)

Februray 29th - Leap Day - 2000 
If you're like most people, you shudder at the thought of one more Y2K 
headache, millenium bug, computer glitch, or Spam-storing person camping out 
in a makeshift fort waiting for the world to end.  The world did not end and 
it's not going to.  But this thought was real-- just momentarily for some, 
yet in others' minds for years: how to get around potential disasters 
resulting from a few misplaced numbers? 
---------------------------------- 
Which brings us to today, February 29, a day created just to get around 
potential disasters.  Leap Day, a day born long ago out of calculation 
dilemmas similar to those we faced more recently. Despite thousands of 
high-paid techies and millions of dollars in innovative software, we were 
still left struggling in Y2K with a number crunch equal to the one faced by 
 team of abacus-toting scientists and mathematicians in 1582.  How 
far have we come? It took nearly 1600 years of fine-tuning our modern-day 
calendar to avoid such disasters as snow falling in July and sunbathing in 
November. The flaws encountered within the otherwise ingenious Roman Calendar 
make for Leap Day's unique history. 
------------------------- 
The original Roman 355 day calendar had an extra 22-day month every few years 
to maintain the correct seasonal changes. By the time Julius Caesar took 
reign, the seasons no longer occurred during the same months they once had. 
Panicking, he remedied this in 44 B.C. by tossing the extra month and adding 
the extra day to a few months instead.  He threw in a month in honor of 
himself (Julius-- July) and died a happy man having solved the calendar woes. 
Not quite. Still creating seasonal confusion, the calendar was again changed, 
first from an extra day every 3 years, to one every 4 years in 8 A.D.  It was 
then finally perfected  with some complicated logic by Pope Gregory XIII in 
1582 (who predicted Easter and Christmas would eventually fall on top of each 
other without his divine intervention). He determined that Leap Day should
fall on any year divisible by 4 but not 100 (except when the year is 
divisible by 400), setting up a calendar nearly identical to that of Mother 
Nature.  Thus, today our year is 365.2425 days, off from our solar year by 
.00031, or one day's error over 4,000 years.  Not bad.  And without this
extra day, who knows of the chaos that might have ensued? 
-------------------------------------------- 
If you're a "Leaper," you will celebrate today with passion close to the 
fervor of this past New Year's Eve.  Party till you drop; make up for the 3 
years you spent watching friends and family hit milestone birthdays on days
that actually exist.  Cherish the fact that you have beaten the 1,506 odds 
against being born on Leap Day, into this secret society, a parallel universe 
that flashes before our eyes every 4 years restoring order to all mankind. 
Sigh some relief that you don't have to spend Birthday 2000 on February 28th 
or March 1st, pretending again. If you're 40, convince yourself you're 10 and 
reconnect with your inner child. Throw a party with Frog Legs, Hops, and 
Grasshopper Pie on the menu, and serve Leap Year Cocktails. Join the 
Worldwide Leap Year Birthday Club and attend the Worldwide Leap Year 
Festival. And buy one of those annoying desktop zodiak calendars you've 
always wanted, to read your real birthday horoscope! 
---------------------------------- 
If you're a woman, wait no longer for that engagement ring-- today, Sadie 
Hawkins day, is your day to propose marriage. This tradition originates in 
Ireland in the 5th century, when St. Bridget convinced St. Patrick to allow 
one day that a woman could propose.  If the man refused, he was fined 
(incidentally, St. Bridget proposed to St. Patrick that day; he said no).
1,600 years later, the fine has been ousted (who's idea was that?), but women 
still have only this one day every 4 years set aside to profess their love 
and commitment for the men in their lives. Again, just how far have we come? 
-------------------------------------------- 
For most not fortunate enough to celebrate a birthday today, it may be simply 
an extra day we have to trudge to work without getting paid. Even so, it's
one special day out of every 1,460 that somehow, in the grand scheme of 
things, prevents seasons from colliding and keeps life interesting. 
by AS Dawson 2/23/2000 ©

@ February 29 LEAP DAY - LEAP YEAR
It's My Birthday Finally! A Leap Year Story 2nd Edition (Paperback)
It's My Birthday Finally!
A Leap Year Story 2nd Edition
by Michelle Whitaker Winfrey
(Paperback - Jul 1, 2007)



One my favorite math books! 
Innumeracy:Mathematical Illiteracy and ItsConsequences

by John Allen Paulos 

One my favorite authors!
John Grisham

One of my favorite musicians
Jimmy Buffett


Planet Earth - The Complete BBC Series --  DVD ~ David Attenborough
Planet Earth - The Complete BBC Series

(watch preview click on link!!!)
DVD ~ David Attenborough
on [Blu-ray]
Grift gift for older leap day babies!

A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose (Oprah's Book Club, Selection 61)
A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose (Oprah's Book Club, Selection 61) (Paperback)
by Eckhart Tolle (Author)

The Appeal - John Grisham

7th Heaven (Women's Murder Club) by James Patterson (Author)
7th Heaven (Women's Murder Club)
by James Patterson (Author),


101 Dalmatians (Two-Disc Platinum Edition)
101 Dalmatians (Two-Disc Platinum Edition)

Release Date: March 4, 2008
Available for pre-order

The Aristocats (Special Edition) DVD ~ Phil Harris
The Aristocats (Special Edition) (1970)

DVD ~ Phil Harris




















































 

What Happened on February 29th ....... 
 
So the question is, 
"Which years are leap years"
----------------
Here is the rule:
You get a Birthday if the year is:
  • divisible by 4 and
  • is not divisible by 100 unless
  • it is divisible by 400
  • 1700, 1800, and 1900 were not leap years 
    (divisible by 100, but not 400)

    So we conclude that 1600 was a leap year 
    and 2000 is a leap year (400).
    more explanation


    WOMEN STILL WAITING FOR THAT RING?
    FEBRUARY 29th 2008 it is your turn to propose to us men!
     -----------------------------------
    FEBRUARY 29th is also known as Sadie Hawkins Day
    Rules of courtship are less stricter now than years ago when women who were hoping to marry their beaus had to wait for a proposal; they were not allowed to pop the question themselves... except on one day, every four years. Yep, on Feb 29,
    also known as Sadie Hawkins Day.
    But beware of  St. Patrick he might say NO!
    Learn more about Sadie Hawkins Day.
    google listing
    -----------------------------


    another interesting site with info on Calendars
    http://astro.nmsu.edu/~lhuber/leaphist.html
    Leap Year is a year in which an extra day in added tothe calendar in order to synchronize it with the seasons.  February 29 LEAP Year - LEAP Day offers up
    facts and stats for those of us lucky enough to be born 
    on February 29 LEAP Year - LEAP Day
    Worldwide Leap Year Festival
    Page author: Lyle Huber   click for more info

    ---------------------
    Anthony, NM/TX 
    Feb. 26 - Feb. 29, 2004

    Click Photo To Read
    article from the El Paso Times
    about the upcoming celebration. 

    Classic Leap Day Photo
    from Jayne Snay

    CLICK HERE


    Are you at least 51/4Leap Years old? then you can try one of these

    Leap Year Cocktail
    Courtesy of  www.hotwired.com

    Famous Leap Year Babies-
    "Herman Hollerith Feb 29, 1860, who had been a special agent for the 1880 census, developed punch cards and electric tabulating machines in time to process the census returns, reducing considerably the time needed to complete the clerical work. Hollerith's venture became part of what is now the IBM Corporation."Click here for more on history of the Census
    1468- Pope Paul III (1534-1549) http://www.vatican.va/
    More Famous Leap Year Babies
     
    Computers ~ Year 2000 ~ Leap Day   iQual  www.iqual.co.uk

    World Birthday Web - People listed as born on Feb. 29

    Leap Seconds explained- U.S. Naval Observatory
    Honor Society of Leap Year Day Babies

    9,792babies were born on February 29 in the United States in 1988
    Andrew Starr's Page- LeapDay
    Are you a "29-er"?
     @ February 29LEAP DAY - LEAP YEAR 04© 1995-2004
    Think about the math. by John Strohsacker
    ----------------------------
    Our solar year is 365.24219 days (time required for the Earth to travel once around the Sun).  Our calendar year is either 365 in non leap years or 366 in leap years. It is simply a math formula. How do we make our calendar year consistent with the solar year?  If we had a leap year every 4 years, we would get 365.25 days and we would eventually have our seasons (winter, spring, summer, fall) in the wrong months.  So to get .25 to .24219,  we have to skip a few leap days.  It was decided (based on the math) that once every 100 years (Century marks) we skip a leap day - except every 400th year.  The year 1600 was the exception (Feb 29th occurred), and now the year 2000 is also the exception.  Again think about the math.  Within 100 years, we have a leap day added every fourth year except once.  This makes our calendar year 365.25 - .01, or 365.24. Then to catch that .00219, we add a leap day every 400th year (+.0025).  This is how we get 365.2425, which is pretty darn close to the solar year 365.24219 - off by .00031 or one day after 4000 years.
    -----------------------------------
    Pretty smart thinking back in 1582. 
    "Pope Gregory realized that this meant
     that the date of Easter would eventually not fall in the spring
     but would become closer and closer to DEC 25, Christmas. "
    RGO
    The Royal Observatory Greenwich is a great site for lots of info.
    http://www.rog.nmm.ac.uk/
     Hope I cleared this question up for you. If there are any mathematicians that find any corrections to this explanation let me know. >>>> mailto:leap@mystro.com?subject= Math Leap Suggestion
     John

    One my favorite math books! 
    InnumeracyInnumeracy : Mathematical Illiteracy and ItsConsequencesby John Allen Paulos
    Review
    Booknews, Inc. , September 1, 1989
    Paulos (mathematics, Temple U.) examines many aspects of popular culture, from stock scams and newspaper psychics to diet and medical claims to demonstrate the popular misperceptions resulting from the inability to deal with large numbers, probability, ratios. No bibliography or index. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or. 
     
    DAY
    "time required for a celestial body to turn once on its axis especially the period of the Earth's rotation."EB
    YEAR
    "time required for the Earth to travel once around the Sun, about 365 1/4 days. This fractional number makes necessary the periodic intercalation of days in any calendar that is to be kept in step with the seasons"EB
    LEAP YEAR
    "Year containing some intercalary period, especially a Gregorian year having a 29th day of February instead of the standard 28 days. The astronomical year, the time taken for the Earth to complete its orbit around the Sun, is about 365.242199 days" EB
     Gregorian Calendar
    The Gregorian Calendar was proclaimed in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII as a reform of the Julian calendar established by Julius Caesar. 
    We use the Gregorian Calendar today.  The Gregorian "calendar year is now 365.2425 days and the error compared with the true
    value amounts to only 3 days in 10,000 years."RGO


    Copyright © 1995-2008 http://www.mystro.com/
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY LEAP DAY BABIES !